Container conversion: Part 4

Cameron the Handyman container conversation

This will probably be the last update on the container conversion project for 2015. There are still a few things to do, including lining and fitting out the store-room/bathroom of the studio, as well as all the exterior work.

Since the last container conversion update

However, since the last update the plastering and painting has been finished, the power has been switched on, the kitchenette is 95% installed (silicon seal yet to be done and water not yet turned on), the flooring is in, the plumbing has been done to a point I can now finish it off, and the Artist has moved in and made herself at home.

There’s not a lot of technical detail to share in terms of getting the space looking more like an artist studio than a shipping container, as the skills required in plastering, painting, laying flooring and plumbing can be done by anyone with that experience or willingness to learn. If you’re unsure though, always get a qualified tradie…or a handyman with those skills.

A tip

One tip at this point though: if you’re considering doing a job like this, put time aside for it. This one has dragged on because I’ve been busy and the weekends have been scarce. Either that, or pay someone else to do it.

Electricians and plumbers are worth the money you pay them because if you attempt to do it yourself and you don’t know what you’re doing, things can go very, very wrong. I’m fairly handy with basic plumbing, but I made a call to bring in the experts after starting the process and not being happy with how it was panning out. Warwick Edwards’ boys left me enough to finish off the job, including digging the trench from the rainwater tank to the studio…

Heat proofing

Despite being extremely well insulated, after a really hot spell at the end of September that nearly cooked the resident Artist, she promptly went out and bought blinds – both internal and external. With two banks of louvered windows (north and south), a ceiling fan mounted between the windows (over the work space) and another fan up the western end of the studio, it was decided we needed to cut the direct heat coming into the space from the northern aspect.

Shade cloth style external blinds (from Bunnings) were mounted over the northern facing windows and black roller blinds were cut down and fitted to the northern French doors (a set has yet to be installed on the southern doors as well, which will reduce the light when projecting videos on to the end wall of the studio). Eventually, there’ll be a skillion roof over the container that will keep the heat off the exterior metal, as well as timber cladding on the western end of the building. Combined, with shade from the trees in the garden surrounding the studio, it should keep it at a reasonable temperature without the need for air conditioning during most the year (January/February excepted). Since installing the blinds, the internal temperature hasn’t gone much above 27 degrees, which is workable with the overhead fan on, the French doors and the louvered windows open. There’s a distinct change in temperature between the finished space and the unfinished storeroom when you open the door between them on a stinking hot day.

Making it pretty

In making the converted container a workable, creative space, the walls have been painted Dulux Lexicon – a cool grey/white. The flat-packed kitchenette (purchased from Bunnings) in gloss white with a recycled pine bench (salvaged from the old kitchen in the house) sealed with a food safe oil, has a round sink set into it with and mixer tap (also from Bunnings) – all designed to not only be cost-effective, but provide as much storage as possible in the 122cm wide x 60cm deep space available. There are three soft-closing drawers in the kitchenette as well as double doors under the sink. There’s even enough space to have a small microwave as well as a kettle! It wasn’t a big space to work with for the splash back, so I used a basic rectangular white tile for the kitchen, buying enough to do the bathroom splash back too when the time comes. It’s grouted with a mid-grey to match the wall paint.

The flooring is a product called AquaStep in Tallowood – an eco-friendly, VOC free, waterproof, floating floor with acoustic qualities and a high commercial fire rating. Having had to traipse in and out of the studio doing jobs since the floor went down, there’s some thought that the colour of the flooring is a problem (so I’m told…), as it shows dust and footprints. A lighter colour – which I do remember was under consideration – is now being thought to have maybe been the better choice. But there ain’t no going back.

The Artist has also installed gallery tracking – moving a large amount of works stored under beds and behind cupboards into the studio.

Given the styling and stuff that’s been going on over the past couple of months, it’s hard to believe what a work site it was not so long ago. I think all parties will be pretty pleased when we can sign off on this one.

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